All in the Family: Why I Became An Orthopedic Surgeon

by Dr. Joshua Dines
6.15 Blog

For Father’s Day, I was asked to reflect on what it is like to be able to work together with my dad (Dr. David M. Dines). In a word … special. But that is an over simplification. I personally can’t imagine many more rewarding things in life than doing what you love to do with one of the people you love most.

There are several father-son combinations working at Hospital for Special Surgery including the Ranawats and the Sculcos, which, to me, highlights just how special a place it is. The dedication to excellence, the pride exhibited by its employees and the institution’s goal of being the best were all attributes that our fathers espoused and impressed on to us. Seeing how happy my father was working at such a hospital clearly played an influential role in how I became interested in orthopedic surgery.

Despite that, my road to becoming an orthopedic surgeon is not what many people would assume. Though my father’s love for his profession was always obvious and even contagious, there was never any pressure that I should follow the same path. I was convinced during my first few years at college that I would go to law school or work in finance. It came as a huge surprise to my parents when, after my junior year, I announced that I wanted to go to medical school. Looking back now, I can’t believe I even considered doing something else.

Whether it is the OR staff at the hospital or patients themselves, I am constantly reminded of just how lucky I am to be able to work so closely with my father doing what both of us love: taking care of patients. Orthopedic Surgery at HSS is practiced at such a high level that when casual observers listen to surgeons discuss a case, it is almost as if the surgeons are speaking a different language. Being able to speak that language with my dad is special. We have so much fun performing a challenging surgery or reviewing MRIs together, particularly because we realize how lucky we are to be able to do what we love to do in one of the best hospitals in the world. The great times we have travelling to meetings or taking care of the US Davis Cup tennis team or Long Island Ducks together is something that few understand, but I never take it for granted

As a new father myself, I only hope I can be as good a role model as my father was for me. And maybe, just maybe, my daughter Poppy will one day be asked to write a blog post about being a 3rd-generation HSS surgeon.

Dr. Joshua Dines is an orthopedic surgeon and a member of the Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service at Hospital for Special Surgery. He is a team doctor for the U.S. Davis Cup tennis team, an assistant team physician for the New York Mets and a consultant for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Topics: Featured, Orthopedics
Tags: ,
The information provided in this blog by HSS and our affiliated physicians is for general informational and educational purposes, and should not be considered medical advice for any individual problem you may have. This information is not a substitute for the professional judgment of a qualified health care provider who is familiar with the unique facts about your condition and medical history. You should always consult your health care provider prior to starting any new treatment, or terminating or changing any ongoing treatment. Every post on this blog is the opinion of the author and may not reflect the official position of HSS. Please contact us if we can be helpful in answering any questions or to arrange for a visit or consult.

Comments

Bromwatson says:

Very interesting post. Becoming an orthopedic surgeon is a very challenging, but very rewarding too. You can help a variety of patients and there are a variety of different jobs you can have in this field.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>