Treatment Options for a Torn Meniscus

by HSS on the Move
Knee pain

A meniscus tear is a common knee injury which mostly occurs when a person quickly turns the body, pivoting on the knee while the foot is held in place. This motion results in a twisting within the knee that can tear the meniscus, a structure in the knee that spans and cushions the space between the joint surfaces of the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia). Orthopedic surgeons Russell Warren, MD, and Scott Rodeo, MD, provide an overview of treatment options:

Non-operative

  1. A non-operative physical therapy treatment program will often focus first on reducing pain and maintaining the full motion of the knee.
  2. Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications such asIbuprofen may also be prescribed.
  3. After the initial injury pain has decreased and the knee motion is restored, treatment may move to muscle strengthening.

Operative

  1. If surgery is required for treatment of the meniscal tear, this will likely be performedarthroscopically through small incisions, using a fiber-optic camera and small specialized instruments. These instruments allow careful removal of the torn sections or repair of the meniscal tear with sutures or “tacks.”
  2. Since the meniscus has an important role in the long-term health and function of the knee, the surgeon will always attempt to keep or repair any part of the meniscus that has the blood supply and potential to heal. Some meniscal tears occur in the “avascular” part of the meniscus and cannot be repaired. In this case, the torn portion of the meniscus is removed. If the tear is large and occurs in a part of the meniscus with a good blood supply, then a repair may be performed.

The post-operative recovery from repair of a meniscal tear is extremely important and will vary according to the type of meniscal surgery that is required. The early rehabilitation will focus on achieving full knee motion and reducing the swelling from surgery. After this has been achieved, the primary focus will be on restoring muscle strength.

Topics: Facebook Notes, Orthopedics
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The information provided in this blog by HSS and our affiliated physicians is for general informational and educational purposes, and should not be considered medical advice for any individual problem you may have. This information is not a substitute for the professional judgment of a qualified health care provider who is familiar with the unique facts about your condition and medical history. You should always consult your health care provider prior to starting any new treatment, or terminating or changing any ongoing treatment. Every post on this blog is the opinion of the author and may not reflect the official position of HSS. Please contact us if we can be helpful in answering any questions or to arrange for a visit or consult.

Comments

Darlene Barry says:

Hi. My husband”s MRI showed a torn meniscus, that Dr. Youm feels warrants sx.
Would a 2nd opinion at HSS be welcome?
Our ins. is Cigna.
We live here on York Ave.
My husband also had a very close call from a surgery due to aspirin induced asthma that he was unaware of, until he was under general anethesia.
So we have concerns.
Many Thanks for any suggestions,

Sincerely,

Darlene Barry

HSS on the Move says:

Hi Darlene, thank you for reaching out to us. To make an appointment for a second opinion for your husband’s torn meniscus, please contact Physician Referral Service at 877-606-1555 or visit them online at https://www.hss.edu/secure/prs-appointment-request.asp.

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