Why I Ride with the HSS Cycling Team

by Dr. David S. Levine
Hospital for Special Surgery Cycling Team

Written by: Dr. David S. Levine, Foot & Ankle Surgeon

About eight years ago a friend of mine suggested that we start riding bicycles for exercise.  As an orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery, I was receptive to the idea of maintaining my health, though a bit wary of the possibility of injury while moving so quickly.  Little did I know that this was the start of a major transformation in my life.  I was hooked immediately!  Cycling is a low impact exercise.  Health benefits include cardiac conditioning, improved pulmonary function, muscular development, reduction in body fat, cholesterol and blood pressure. The benefits extend well beyond physiology. One can ride in a fast-paced group or can leisurely ‘cruise’ through a quiet community on the weekend.  As for the competitive nature of the sport, you can compete against your friends or attempt to beat your last best time from seasons past.

As it turned out, a number of the physicians from Hospital for Special Surgery meet daily for a morning ride in Central Park.  And we are not alone.  There can be up to a hundred cyclists riding around the 6 plus-mile loop each morning.  This daily ritual begins shortly before 6am when we meet at the Hospital and ride crosstown to the park.  It is important to recognize that cyclists share the park with runners, walkers, rollerbladers, dogs, horses and an occasional raccoon.  Not to mention that part of the loop opens to vehicular traffic at 7am.  Everyone should obey the rules of the road, be respectful of those moving faster and slower than yourself.  Be courteous and cautious and enjoy one of the most beautiful urban cycling opportunities in the world!

As for the HSS Cycling Team, 3 or 4 loops later (at a 22 mph average) we head back to the hospital, clean up and end up in office hours or the operating rooms no later than 8am.  The results have been substantial.  We often conclude our cycling season by taking a group trip to the mountains of France where we climb some of the Dr. David S. Levine, Orthopedic Surgeonfamed peaks of the Tour d’ France.  The metamorphosis into thick-legged, skinny torso, Lycra-clad surgeon with colleagues who have become my closest friends has been the reward. So if you’re interested in great, low-impact exercise with like-minded people before the rest of your day begins, start pushing those pedals. See you in the park!

Topics: Rehabilitation and Fitness
Tags: , ,
The information provided in this blog by HSS and our affiliated physicians is for general informational and educational purposes, and should not be considered medical advice for any individual problem you may have. This information is not a substitute for the professional judgment of a qualified health care provider who is familiar with the unique facts about your condition and medical history. You should always consult your health care provider prior to starting any new treatment, or terminating or changing any ongoing treatment. Every post on this blog is the opinion of the author and may not reflect the official position of HSS. Please contact us if we can be helpful in answering any questions or to arrange for a visit or consult.

Comments

Juan Barraza says:

It was great riding with you guys in the Bloomin Metric. The pace line ran like a well oiled machine. Thanks for letting my friend Roger and I to hold your wheels. See you in the park!

HSS on the Move says:

Thanks for the comment, Juan! We’ll share it with Dr. Levine.

Beth Goodman says:

I was a patient of Dr Levine”s several years ago for foot surgery. He is outstanding. My experience was flawless and that is hard to say about foot surgery. Over the July 4th weekend, my right knee went out and I am wondering specifically if I need to see Dr Levine or if he can recommend a physician to look at my knee ASAP. I feel like it keeps dislocating. Scary stuff. Can you get this note to dr. Levine?

Best Wishes, Beth Goodman

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

HSS on Facebook

Facebook Status

Hospital for Special Surgery
April 19, 2014 at 12:00 pm

The NHL playoffs are underway, and having a strong abdominal and core muscle strength is important for keeping players in top form. Gregory Reinhardt, HSS Physical Therapist, says: "While skating, the activation of a hockey player's oblique muscles is crucial for their ability to constantly push off from their skates." To read more about core strength for hockey players, visit http://hss.edu/onthemove/core-strength-for-hockey-players/.

Facebook Picture
  • Blogroll

  • Categories

  •