Adoption of Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty at Hospital for Special Surgery: a Cohort Study


Edwin P. Su, MD

Edwin P. Su, MD

Assistant Attending Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery

Sherwin L. Su, MD
Orthopedic Surgery, St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center, Patterson, NJ

Abstract

Background 
Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is an alternative to traditional total hip replacement (THR) that allows for the preservation of femoral bone. It is a more technically difficult procedure that has led some researchers to report an unsatisfactory learning curve (Berend et al., J Bone Joint Surg Am Suppl 2:89–92, 2011; Mont et al., Clin Orthop Relat Res 465:63–70, 2007).

Purpose 
The purpose of this study was to investigate the adoption of HRA at our institution, examining the clinical results, revision rate, and modes of failure. Additionally, a comparison of three different implant systems was performed.

Methods 
A retrospective review of a consecutive series of HRA performed at our institution between the years 2004 and 2009 was carried out. A total of 820 HRA with a minimum of 2 years of follow-up were included in the study. The majority of included patients were males (70%), with osteoarthritis (92%). The average age was 49.8 years, and the mean BMI was 27.5 kg/m2.

Results 
The average Harris hip score improved from 61 to 96.5 postoperatively. Thirteen revisions (1.6%) were performed for femoral neck fracture, femoral head osteonecrosis, acetabular loosening, metal reactivity/metallosis, and metal allergy. The overall Kaplan–Meier survival curve with revision surgery as an endpoint showed 98.5% survival at 5 years. There were no observable differences in clinical scores or revision rates between the different implant systems.

Conclusions 
HRA can be successfully adopted with a low complication rate, given careful patient selection, specialized surgical training, and use of good implant design.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 8, Number 3.
View the full article at springerlink.com.

About the HSS Journal

HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal published three times a year, February, July and October. The Journal accepts and publishes peer reviewed articles from around the world that contribute to the advancement of the knowledge of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.

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