Clinical and Morphologic Factors Associated with Suture Anchor Refixation of Labral Tears in the Hip

HSS Journal: Volume 10, Issue 1

John A. Ruder, BS

University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Erin Magennis, BA

Hospital for Special Surgery


Anil S. Ranawat, MD

Anil S. Ranawat, MD

Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College
Assistant Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
Assistant Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery

Bryan T. Kelly, MD

Bryan T. Kelly, MD

Associate Attending Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, Hospital for Special Surgery
Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College

Abstract

Background

The acetabular labrum is critical to hip function. Surgical options for treatment of a damaged labrum include removal, debridement, and refixation using suture anchors.

Questions/Purposes

The purpose of this study is to determine if certain patient demographic and osseous morphological factors result in increased labral damage requiring refixation.

Methods

Data was collected prospectively from a consecutive series of 334 procedures performed from August 2010 to June 2011 for femoroacetabular impingement. Demographic data, including age, sex, and race, was collected from patient charts. Three-dimensional (3D) CT scans were reviewed to retrieve alpha angles, acetabular version, femoral version, and lateral center edge angle on the symptomatic hip.

Results

In 238 (71.3%) of the procedures, the labrum required refixation using suture anchors with a mean of 2.74 anchors being used. Of males, 78.8% required suture anchors and 62.3% of females required suture anchors. Among procedures requiring suture anchors, significantly more suture anchors were used in males (2.92) than females (2.47). Regression analysis showed a positive association between alpha angle, acetabular retroversion at 1 and 2 o’clock, and the number of suture anchors used. The mean alpha angle in the cohort that required suture anchors (63.1°) was significantly greater than the cohort that did not (59.4°).

Conclusion

This study found femoral deformities to contribute more to labral damage than acetabular deformities and highlighted the importance of preoperative 3D CT scans. This study provides demographic and morphologic factors to review preoperatively to evaluate if extensive labral damage is present and if suture anchor refixation will be required.

Level of Evidence: Level II evidence; Development of diagnostic criteria on basis of consecutive patients.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 10, Issue 1.
View the full article at springerlink.com.

About the HSS Journal

HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal published three times a year, February, July and October. The Journal accepts and publishes peer reviewed articles from around the world that contribute to the advancement of the knowledge of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.

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