Creating an Academy of Medical Educators: How and Where to Start

Jessica R. Berman, MD
Associate Attending Physician, Hospital for Special Surgery
Instructor in Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

Juliet Aizer, MD, MPH
Assistant Attending Physician, Hospital for Special Surgery
Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

Anne R. Bass, MD
Associate Attending Physician, Hospital for Special Surgery
Program Director Rheumatology Fellowship Program, Hospital for Special Surgery
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

William L. Cats-Baril, PhD
University of Vemont, Burlington, VT


Edward J. Parrish, MD

Assistant Attending Rheumatologist, Hospital for Special Surgery
Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

Laura Robbins, DSW, CSW, MSW

Senior Vice President, Education & Academic Affairs, Hospital for Special Surgery

Designated Institutional Officer, GME

Associate Research Professor of Social Work in Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Associate Scientist, Research Division, Hospital for Special Surgery

Executive Editor, HSS Journal

Chair, Arthritis Foundation

Jane E. Salmon, MD

Attending Physician, Hospital for Special Surgery
Senior Scientist, Hospital for Special Surgery
Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

Stephen A. Paget, MD, FACP, FACR

Physician-in-Chief Emeritus, Hospital for Special Surgery

Abstract

Background

While most faculty members want to improve as teachers, they neither know where their educational strengths and weaknesses lie nor where or how to begin to effect a change in their teaching abilities. The lack of actionable, directed and specific feedback, and sensible and sensitive metrics to assess performance and improvement complicates the attainment of educational excellence.

Purpose

The purpose of this article was to outline a series of specific steps that medical education programs can take to enhance the quality of teaching, promote teaching excellence, elevate the status and value of medical educators, and stimulate the creation of innovative teaching programs and curricula.

Methods

To achieve these goals at the Hospital for Special Surgery, the Academy of Rheumatology Medical Educators was formed. The academy had the following goals: (1) create within our institution a mission which advances and supports educators, (2) establish a membership composed of distinguished educators, (3) create a formal organizational structure with designated leadership, (4) dedicate resources that fund mission-related initiatives and research, and (5) establish a plan for promoting teachers as well as enhancing and advancing educational scholarship.

Results

The Hospital for Special Surgery Academy of Rheumatology Medical Educators was recently formed to address these goals by promoting teaching and learning of musculoskeletal skills in an environment that is supportive to educators and trainees and provides much needed resources for teacher.

Summary

The development of a pilot academy of medical educators represents one of the high-priority goals of those institutions that wish to elevate and enrich their teaching through a structured, proven approach.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 8, Number 2.
View the full article at springerlink.com.

About the HSS Journal

HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal published three times a year, February, July and October. The Journal accepts and publishes peer reviewed articles from around the world that contribute to the advancement of the knowledge of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.


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