Nerve Transfers for Adult Traumatic Brachial Plexus Palsy


Scott W. Wolfe, MD

Scott W. Wolfe, MD

Chief Emeritus, Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Hospital for Special Surgery
Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Nerve Repair, Weill Cornell Medical College
Director, Center for Brachial Plexus and Traumatic Nerve Injury
Faculty Director of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery
Member, Executive Council, Hospital for Special Surgery
Senior Scientist, Research Division, Hospital for Special Surgery

Rachel S. Rohde, MD
Center for Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery

Abstract
Adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries can have devastating effects on upper extremity function.  Although neurolysis, nerve repair, and nerve grafting have been used to treat injuries to the plexus, nerve transfer makes use of an undamaged nerve to supply motor input over a relatively short distance to reinnervate a denervated muscle.  A review of several recent innovations in nerve transfer surgery for brachial plexus injuries is illustrated with surgical cases performed at this institution.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 3, Number 1.
View the full article at springerlink.com.


About the HSS Journal
HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal, is published twice a year, February and September, and features articles by internal faculty and HSS alumni that present current research and clinical work in the field of musculoskeletal medicine performed at HSS, including research articles, surgical procedures, and case reports.

^ Back to Top
Request an Appointment